Monsoonal Magic

The Mount Carbine Tableland open forest has been transformed in the past few weeks from a dry parched landscape to a picture of lush new growth after the monsoonal rain. Species such as the perennial Native Rosella (Abelmoschus moschatus subsp. tuberosus) lies dormant in the dry seasonal and then emerges from its tuber during the wet season. The bush-tucker plant only flowers for one day. This paddock near Mount Molloy has been subjected to a hot late-season fire that has removed the weedy understory and now is a canvas of iridescent green new growth with splashes of the Rosella’s watermelon-pink hibiscus flowers.

Is the Great Bowerbird a seasoned fire manager?

 

This Great Bowerbird (Chlamydera nuchalis) bower scattered with snail shells, gravel and various colourful treasures was admired today by Firecraft Crew in the Mt Garnet area.

Bowerbirds have always been recognised for their construction abilities, pedantic arrangement of bowers and particular adornments they choose to scatter around the cleared area of the bower to attract females.

But is the cleared area only to make the bower standout?? Some researchers believe these species of bowerbird may have adapted to fire prone environments by deliberately clearing a ‘firebreak’ around their bower to protect it from wildfire…..

Read more here:Firecraft Environmental, Great Bowerbird bower

https://www.newscientist.com/…/dn18568-zoologger-fireproof…/

Adaptations to fire

It is a well discussed topic that the echidna is a heterothermic mammal – meaning they can regulate their temperature as an adaptation for survival. They are the oldest mammal – a monotreme, having survived the times. It is believed the echidna can drop its body temperature during a wildfire and this is a mechanism that allows it to survive for several reasons.This one was spotted by Firecraft on a hike recently up Macalister Range behind Panguna Valley.

Echidna, fire, Firecraft EnvironmentalEchidna and fire